Andrew Drury leads Edgefest Large Ensembles

Andrew Drury

Andrew Drury leads Edgefest Large Ensembles

Sat

10/21/2017

7:30pm

Edgefest

Andrew Drury leads Edgefest Large Ensembles

Edgefest
at Bethlehem United Church of Christ

  • $60 Saturday Edgepass General Admission
  • $15 - this concert only General Admission
  • $5 - this concert only Student
  • Mark Kirschenmann, director
  • Andrew Drury, drums/composer
  • Creative Arts Orchestra
  • Edgefest Artists
  • University of Michigan faculty & students

Event Details

These collaborative pieces and offerings give the listeners and performers a look into the realm of possibilities in composed music with room for self expression.


EDGEFEST 21: Drums Along the Edge is the 21st edition of this annual internationally acclaimed creative avant/jazz music festival presented by Kerrytown Concert House (KCH) in October. The four-day festival will have a unifying purpose: to explore new music created by drummers/percussionists. A roster of distinguished, ground breaking drummer/composers with their ensembles will illuminate the innovative role percussion and these artists, both seasoned and emerging, have played in the avant/jazz world.

An Edgepass ($160) is available, which allows for admission to all events, Wednesday through Saturday, as well as a special dinner Wednesday evening with our Edgefest artists. This Saturday daypass is $60, which allows for admission to all events on Saturday. For general information about the festival, click here.

Edgepasses may be paid for by cash, check, or credit (to KCH) and picked up at Kerrytown Concert House at any time during the festival. Payment for individual concert seats may also be made by cash, check, or credit at the door of each concert site beginning one half hour prior to each show. All seating reserved through phone or e-mail is guaranteed only until performances are scheduled to begin.


Mark Kirschenmann

Mark Kirschenmann, PhD, whose pioneering live electric trumpet performances are internationally acclaimed, is a composer, performer and scholar of creative improvisation. He is also the creative force behind the band E3Q (blockmrecords.org), an eclectic jazz-influenced trio with his wife, cellist Katri Ervamaa and percussionist Michael Gould. Most recently, he released the solo album entitled This Electric Trumpet (sonikmannrecords.com), recorded with the Nashville-based electronica duo Sub-ID (BFF, 1320records.com), and appeared with pianist Thollem McDonas, bassist Henry Grimes, flutist Nicole Mitchell, cornetist Rob Mazurek’s Sao Paulo Underground, saxophonists Oliver Lake and Arthur Blythe, and pianist Iiro Rantala of Trio Töykeät.

As a composer and writer, Mark explores the confluence of composition and improvisation. He has published articles on Messiaen’s use of improvisation as a compositional technique, and on new approaches to melodic jazz improvisation. He is on the faculty at the University of Michigan, where he shares his time between the School of Music (Jazz) and the Residential College, a liberal arts living-learning community. He also directs UM’s Creative Arts Orchestra, an innovative, creative improvisation ensemble, and the Michigan Youth Jazz Ensemble. Mark holds Ph.D. degrees in composition and music theory from the University of Michigan, and lives in Ann Arbor, MI with his wife and their three children.  

Andrew Drury

Andrew Drury grew up near Seattle (USA) and works primarily in avant-jazz and free improvisation, with regular forays into other genres and media. He has performed in Europe and North America, made five CDs as a bandleader, and appeared on over 20 others. He is an acclaimed leader of percussion workshops.

Drury began drumming in the sixth grade band at his school on Bainbridge Island, Washington. After spending a summer digging a basement under his parents' house with a shovel and pick he bought a drum set and began taking lessons from Seattle drummer Dave Coleman, Sr. He later studied with Ed Blackwell, Bill Lowe, Bill Barron, and the writer Annie Dillard at Wesleyan University. He is a self-taught composer.
Drury performs as a soloist, collaborates with adventurous musicians from around the world, and leads several groups that play his compositions. In addition to groups that he leads and frequent encounters with improvisers from various parts of the world he plays regularly with Jason Kao Hwang, Jessica Lurie, Reuben Radding, the Rat Race Choir, the Steve Swell Trio, TOTEM>, Nate Wooley, Jack Wright, and others.

Since 2002 much of Drury's music has been characterized by an exploration of new materials and techniques, and by the use of texture as a central organizing element. He frequently performs using one drum, scraping the head with wood slivers and fingernails, manipulating drum head tension and harmonic patterns with bells, using the drum as an acoustic filter and amplifier for vibrations produced on other objects, and using the drum as a wind instrument.

Drury’s wide ranging interests lead him periodically to explore other media and formats. Inspired by the work and writings of visual artist Robert Smithson, Drury performed and photographed over 20 Earth Solos—site specific drum set solos in desert, mountain, prairie, and industrial settings throughout the western US. He co-created a street theater piece that he performed in streets and political rallies in Nicaragua, Guatemala, and Mexico in 1993. In his work with choreographers (Love of the New Gun, Self-Obliteration Companion, etc.) he has created collages of field recordings and percussion samples, with occasional live mixing, percussion, or prepared piano. His music for dance has been presented at DTW, Joyce Soho, NW New Works Festival, and five cities in Romania.

Drury has led nearly 1,000 percussion workshops and trainings for music teachers and since 1989. Participants have included people of all ages, backgrounds, and physical abilities in rural and urban areas in schools, prisons, museums, Indian reservations, festivals, villages in Nicaragua and Guatemala, as well as the graduate school of the Columbia University School of Social Work. In 2005 he drummed with homeless people and battered women in ten shelters in Indiana. Following a six-month "Millennium Project" residency with the Oneida Nation in 2000 the Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation identified him as "one of the most skilled and experienced community artists in America."